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of the united states of america and to the republic for which it stands, one nation under god, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all. the speaker: the chair will entertain up to five requests for one-minute speeches on each side of the aisle. for what purpose does the gentleman from illinois rise? mr. shimkus: i ask unanimous consent to address the house for one minute and to revise and extend. the speaker: without objection. mr. shimkus: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i rise today to remember and recall the life of carla anderson. carla passed away on july 23, after a month-long fight against an infection. she was 52, a loving mother, devoted wife and deputy executive director of the next generation 911 institute. it was in this capacity that i had the privilege of working with her. technology continued to move forward, congresswoman anna eshoo and i worked closely as part of the congressional e-911 congress. she was part of legislation passed by congress to advance 911 services. in so doing, many lives have been saved. as first responders throughout the country could not on
? >> jon: william la jeunesse, thank you. america needs to pay attention to those reports of a massive and deadly chemical weapons attack in syria. that's the word from president obama. but he also explained why it could hurt us big time if the u.s. gets too involved. plus, a grim milestone on the number of child refugees now trying to escape that bloody civil war. that's still ahead on "the fox report." this man is about to be the millionth customer. would you mind if i go ahead of you? instead we had someone go ahead of him and win fiy thousand dollars. congratulations you are our one millionth customer. nobody likes to miss out. that's why ally treats all their customers the same. whether you're the first or the millionth. if your bank doesn't think you're special anymore, you need an ally. ally bank. your money needs an ally. it's a reality check. i had my reality check when i'd be sitting there with my friends who had their verizon phones and i'd be sitting there like "mine's still loading!" i couldn't get email. i couldn't stream movies. i couldn't upload any of our music. that's
just in time for students to return to school. why she says there is a war on boys in america's classics. schools hostile to young boys. we're going to debate it "fox & friends" hour one starts right now. >> mike, mike, mike, mike, mike, what day is it, mike? >> it's "fox & friends." [rooster crowing] >> clayton: good morning, welcome to "fox & friends." keep track of what day it is, mike. >> mike: it's not hump day it's saturday. it's so interesting to bed in the new studio with the new curvey couch it's so clean. unreal. >> clayton: does this studio look familiar? >> mike: this was mike's studio back in the day. >> mike: not that far back. >> clayton: you guys built this studio. [ buzzer ] >> clayton: coming up in the show a little bit mike was already asking me about this a device that let's you capture audio of anything going on in the day when spousal fights when the wife says to you i never said that you will be able it play this device back on your wrist and say honey, let's listen back to our fight a couple hours ago. >> mike: is this a good thing? >> ainsley: maybe no
day i note that children in america suffer for a variety of reasons. the senate, of course, had a bill that they are pushing through that was at the $54 billion. still very far short of the great needs of this community. so i rise today to say that it landed with a thud and i think more importantly my colleague from texas, again, from houston, spoke on the floor of the house about some untimely language on page 52. i remember it. that cut into the light rail system of houston. it would impact my district. it would stop students at the university of houston and texas southern university from being able to have access to rail, cutting down on their travel costs because there was a provision in the bill that did not fund just a sector of that light rail. my colleagues, how can you build light rail when you cut it in the middle like the western movies when the train rushes up and finds a big hole over the mountain where something has happened and it can't go any further? so it was a bill destined to die, should have died because it lacked compassion. and i stand here opposing any language
of america's most vocal critics. we shouldn't forget the difference between the ability of our government to collect information online under strict guidelines and for narrow purposes than the willingness of some other governments to throw their own citizens in prison for what they say online. >> stephanie: talking to you, putin. >> we're not there. >> stephanie: right. [ ♪ battle hymn of republic ] >> i'm with alan grayson. >> stephanie: what did edward snowden get wrong? everything. andrew lightman in the "l.a. times." we posted this up at stephanie miller facebook. snowden is out of his limbo. i hope the food is lousy, the winter is cold and the internet access is awful. >> it is russia. you're pretty much guaranteed all three of those. >> stephanie: i worry more about the damage snowden has done and could still do to strike the right balance between privacy and security. i do, too. he says those following snowden should understand two key points. first, though many things need to be kept secret in today's dangerous world, the line between secret and not secret is stark. the harsh t
contributions for america. this panel focuses on the economic effects of naturalization. from dallas, this is about one hour. >> a pleasure to be here. i worked for closed with president bush when he was in the white house trying to advance immigration reform in the last battle and so it's a pleasure for me to be back in his beautiful new house, talking about immigration. so thank you to this institute. i want to harken back as we get started to the ceremony that we saw this morning combat incredible moving ceremony because what we're going to talk about here today is not just out immigration is good for america, but have naturalization and citizenship actually even ups the ante and makes immigrants even more beneficial for the united states. to benefit themselves, but it's also a benefit for the country. so the very people we saw this morning when they came in the door, they were great for america but as they went out the door their even more. they will be even more of an asset. we will delve deeper into that. what i want to give him a couple of minutes at a moderate is framing a li
, is the drug cartels and the violent side of is a demand for drugs in the united states of america. whether they have a submarine, like i have seen in colombia. it is a violent place when you have armed members bringing drugs across the border into our country. i do not excuse any action that .ook place but to somehow think it is not dangerous when cartel members are bringing drugs up to this country is not an adequate reading of the situation on the border, and i visit it all the time. said, i think the answer to our border control is technology. you have a point about additional border patrol. one of the things we need more of is customs people so we can .xpedite traffic back and forth there are some of us here old enough to remember we used to be able to walk across and have and walkedgales back. think about doing that today. you bring up problems on the border, and with this surveillance capability, we will people back,keep and then we will be able to send these teams out. finally, the coyotes. we know these coyotes are the worst scum of the earth people, and they are bringing people it
the iraq war. pew research showing 64% of people around the world have a favorable view of america. 64%. so that's a 13-point rise among those same countries when they were last vared back in '07. still in muslim countries like pakistan, frustration over u.s. foreign policy appearing to have only deepened 11%. there's been a dip in approval under president obama. >> leigh, you think that's just obama's transition to presidency over bush? because that last poll was in 2007 and what else would it say? >> i think that has a lot to do with it. i think the world is looking to us for a number of reasons. you know, but i think that it's, you know, i think the timing has a lot to do with it. that was a long time ago. i think under president obama i think our global image has improved. >> joe, you can't forget how unpopular we were at the end of the bush presidency, right? >> no doubt about it. i mean, things were going poorly. of course, we're still having some problems in the middle east but across the rest of the world, across europe, those numbers are certainly up. you know, ed rendell, we've be
and in latin america. sometimes from countries that didn't exist in the world of empire, in the colonial world of 1913, 100 years ago, and 1914 at the start of the first world war. diplomats today represent governments, as they always have, but they also represent international institutions like the united nations. you fly the flag of the united nations here at chautauqua. they represent international institutions like the world bank and the international monetary fund. and i even think people who work for nonprofit organizations, who are dedicated to combating poverty, who want to promote economic development, who are promoting health care, who are trying to promote peace, i think they're diplomats too,. so in that vein think of bill and melinda gates and the enormously positive impact those two people and their foundation are ching on the fight against live aids, the fight to eradicate polio, which is nearly complete. only three countries in the world where polio exists these days. think of the champion figure skater michelle kwan. you saw her in the olympics. she's joined the state departme
they met mayor filner at a meeting of the national women's veterans association of america. the head of the group says at least six other women have complained about the mayor's behavior including kissing, groping and grabbing the full gamut as they put it now the association reports it's cancelled plans to have mayor filner give the keynote speech at a benefit for sexual assault victims later this month a group of kids ruthlessly kicked and punched another child over and over again. and a school bus camera caught the whole thing. and now the question from the police. where was the bus driver as all of this was going down? but, first, a woman named henrietta lax is responsible for some the most important advances in modern medicine. she wasn't a doctor. she lived to be but 31 years old. but her cells were special. they were able to thrive in a laboratory. and scientists around the world have used those unique and very valuable cells for decades. you may know her story from the best seller of immorality life of henrietta lax. for years it went unrecognized that's now changing. i will
. >> out of america's economic future is being impacted by companies controlling access to the internet. susan crawford, sunday night at 9:00 on "afterwards." continues."journal" host: our guest is congressman alan crazy, a democrat from florida, a member of the foreign affairs committee. -- alan grayson. talk about the news from russia that says edward snowden has been granted a one-your temporary asylum in russia. -- one year temporary asylum in russia. any reaction? guest: it is irrelevant. there should be a debate about whether the government should be receiving a record of every one of our phone calls for that's what we should be talking about, not about the leaker but the leaks. host: this is the headline from " the new york times." i want to get your take on a piece of tape from the committee would senator chuck grassley. [video clip] >> what information does the government collect under this program and specifically is anyone's name, address, social security number, or location collected? >> to answer the second part -- name, address, location, social security number is not coll
will agree with you on that. overall, it is not a gloom and doom situation in america. that is my personal view. i think that in time, it will work itself out. title -- we the must do something about the entitlement program. if it were not for obama, it has been this way for a wild -- you cannot blame him about folks who are getting all of these so- called free services in my opinion. host: what kind of business? caller: we are in mental health. host: and why are you republican? caller: because i believe in their tenets, their principles, smaller government, i believe in that. strong military, i believe not. but they work hard. throw my neighbors overboard because i'm doing well. one time i was not doing so well. so because i'm doing well now, do i say to hell with them and throw them aboard? i don't think so. so we have got to have a better approach how we help you use programs come the state understand you have a lot of folks out here give support because if you give them free stuff, there was a advantage of it. but i do not say because i'm doing well now, to heck with them. all right, l
in america today is amazon basoz which is going to rank up there with apple steve jobs. there are huge similarihat he's doing with his business, and what steve jobs did. >>steve: give me examples >> basoz takes all the company profits and plows it back into the business. traditionally wall street doesn't like that. it wants a piece of those profits -- >>andrew: would it be fair to say he got this for a steal, that it was worth maybe ten times this much money ten years ago? >> maybe so, but that was when the "washington post" was a newspaper you bought physically unread. that's not true today. >>andrew: was it a distress sale? >> no. he's bought content. putting this on to his amazon entire for his subscribers. that's another thing very similar between bezos and steve jobs. bezos makes amazon very user friendly, just like jobs made the iphone, the ipod, the ipad friendly. bezos extremely private, the same as steve jobs. amazon is the same in the sense the stock went straight up. >>gretchen: he claims he's going to keep amazon separate. what i am interested in knowing is why would this b
about their making america happen, go to their web site, we're talking about sanjay gupta who startled the medical community yesterday admitting he has been wrong all these years about medical marijuana. he says he just didn't do his research. now that he has, he knows it is good, okay, ought to be legal in all 50 states. we have a documentary about it coming up on cnn on sunday. back to your calls and your comments at 1-866-55-press in just a second. but again, want to encourage you to look into something that could save your life. emergency. it is called emergency link i.d. and think about if you were ever in an accident, god forbid, knocked unconscious, medical teams arrive. they can't communicate with you, can't find out any information about you, solve that problem with emergency link i.d. it is a small tag you attach to your key ring or wallet or purse that tells emergency responders everything they need to know. your medical history, your meds, your allergies, your doctor's contact info and most importantly, whom to notify. that could make the difference between lif
of patients using drivingy rooms in america are utilization. at the medicaid -- you leave a message no one calls you back. there are no appointment available. that's before the expansion. it's going get even worse as time goes forward. it's mapping out the claims on a map five years of data mapping out the home address of every resident and this is only nine square miles a small community. 6% of the city blocks are 10% of the line mass, 18% of the patients, 27% of the visits and 37% of the cost. it's just theroom room and hospital care. all over america they are living collected in buildings. many of which you are funding through state funds and federal funds. these are the two most expensive in the city. these are beautiful buildings with great management. 600 parents who are mostly dual eligible. these are disabled seniorsed at $12 million in payment for the care to go bark over and over to the hospital. the building at the bottom. 300 patients a nursing home 300 patients had 15 million in payment to got hospital. we have mapped out data all over the cub now and found the same pattern
intent on doing something good when they go around violating the rights of every citizen in america. all the badrs things happening in this a administration that obama calls a hoax. i am sure the mainstream media will jump all over this, but they do not tell us anything else. you see the same headlines for 10 days in a row on the computer. host: thank you for the call. this is a story from " washington times" web site. unnamed u.s. officials told media outlets that intelligence agencies in yemen alerted washington to the threats as the yemeni president came to the u.s. to meet members of congress last thursday." michael is joining us next from philadelphia, democratic line, good morning. caller: thank you for covering this important topic. i was wondering if you have any insight or sources that revealed why it is such a general area being covered as opposed to, say, 36 -- 3 specific countries? that is one question. the other is a common about how unstable these places are these days. pakistan has never been stable in recent memory. a contributing factor. of course then there is the bengh
to attack obama care because they want to hurt america. >>> a freshman, watch this, sinking an amazing half-court shot. that's only half the story. the other half of the story may be better. we'll tell you what his future will look like at that school. "fox & friends" begins right now. >>> good sunday morning, everyone. welcome in to "fox & friends," tucker carlson anna kooiman, clayton morris. >> good morning. >> we want to congratulate a new sports network. >> fox 1. >> find that on the cable dial. congratulations to them. they are kicking off. we wish them well. next year there will be fox sports 2. they will be two years old. >> i see. he'll be here all week, all morning for the next four hours nim. we have a fox news alert to get to. egypt braces for another day of bloody protest after security forces storm a mosque in cairo. protesters and armed men barricaded themselves inside. hundreds died in bloody street battles this week including the son of the muslim brotherhood spiritual leader. this as the egyptian government considered out laug the brotherhood just a month after it held pow
that might cause the government to start looking over their shoulder. this is not the america that most of us grew up in and believe in. >> clayton: so when he -- when the president to tucker's point earlier says that we should trust the executive branch, we are doing everything in our power to make sure we are being transparent, it's simply not true there are two reasons why this is not true. number one is, they kept did from the american people. actually three reasons. the american people are important. they kept it from congress, also. and they kept the very things that the fisa court is supposed to oversee from the fisa court. the documents, the audit supposed to be presented to congress they never did. never gave it to the fisa court and american people don't know about it there is your transparency. >> not all democrats upset about it. the left wing of the democratic party to their great credit, ron why den, dennis kucinich, they're upset. >> alisyn: let's talk about other things that the president is doing that has certainly republicans upset. that is the president has basically decide
constituents during a town hall meeting in oklahoma. >> c-span, created by america's cable companies in 1979, brought to you as a public service by your television provider. >> host: walt mossberg, has technology plateaued? >> guest: oh, no, absolutely not. absolutely not. technology is always changing and always coming up with -- technology companies are always coming up with something new, and there are new technology companies all the time incubating, a lot of them are in what we call stealth mode. we don't even know who they are. certain technologies plateau and things move on, but in general, no. not at all. >> host: i guess i ask that because the last couple years we've had the explosion of smartphones, we've had tablets come online. what's out there? >> guest: well, first of all, there are vast numbers of people especially in the less developed cups, but even in the developed countries who don't own a smartphone and, certainly, there are vast thurms that don't own -- numbers that don't own a tablet. to give you a rough example, apple -- which leads in the tablet market -- has sold som
then will america do? what will iran do? what will russia do but i started off, mr. speaker, by making a reference for the first world war, next year we are going to be commemorating the stinking great of the events of august 1914. and those events have a worrying parallel because you have a series of actions and reactions which drew in an escalating fashion one country after another. nobody thought that the assassination of an obscure archduke woodley toward world event. this is a powder keg and we should not be lobbing weapons into the heart of such combustible material. >> we will break away from this british house of commons debate on syria at this point. were expected this debate to continue for several hours with possible votes later today. taking a look at democratic congressman saying there's no vital national security involved, even if it's in government has proved to deliver did use chemical weapons, which -- republican scott wigle tweets what's happening right now in british parliament should be happening in the u.s. congress. moral issue. is a death caused by chemical weapons wors were
forcing -- there is an organizing i'm advising calling the compact for america trying to get a balanced budget amendment and get a convention call a nifty idea to control a run away convention. there are policy innovations that states are trying to put together, again, across a host of areas left, right, which is trying to reassert the original dynamic. not nullify. states cannot say federal law is no good. just to rebalance the power in the country. host: ian, can you speak to federal effort pushing back? if that's the way right to look at this. what is or what can the federal government do once states put these efforts into place? guest: if we are talking about an actual nullification law, that's when the state tries to forbid the federal government from forcing its own law, those laws are void almost automatically. guest: john c. calhoun is probably roaming the studios right now. guest: the federal official would try to enforce the law, presumably the state would try to stop them. and then it would be very easy for the federal government to get a court order to say that the state can
be with again. >> thanks for joining us america lives starts right now. nstarting with a fox news alert. dozens of employees have been air lifted in yemen. there was a decision to evacuate and growing concerns over extremely high security threat level. welcome everyone to america live. i am jamie colby. >> and i am gregg jarret. we are in for megyn kelliy. the state department is urging all american citizens to get out and leave the country. intelligence officials have increased chatter about an imminent attack in and around the araban peninsula where a dangerous al-qaeda have set up shop. the british government also shut down their own embassy in yemen followed six days of increased u.s. drone strikes due to the threat that prompted the closure of 19 u.s. embassy and consulates in the middle east and africa. wendall joins us. >> the latest drone strike occurred when four suspected members of al-qaeda were killed in the car they were riding in. shortly after that attack the state department announced the u.s. embassy was evacuated and appears more than nonessential personnel was f
america taking new action. the u.s. military evacuated americans out of the embassy in yemen and they are intensifying the hunt for the leaders of the terror plot. so does this mean the risk has increased tonight? abc's chief foreign affairs correspondent martha raddatz tells us what is happening right now. >> reporter: today a u.s. navy reconnaissance plane circled yemen's capital, scouring the streets and alley ways below searching for terrorist operatives behind a plan u.s. intelligence believes involves a strike on the u.s. embassy or other western targets with explosive trucks. craig, a freelance journalist in the city described the eyes in the sky. >> it was buzzing for at least five hours. then there was a break for an hour or two and then it was back again. >> reporter: taking no chances, the u.s. air force air lifted almost all of the u.s. personal out to safety, leaving only the most essential personal behind. tonight we know this is the man behind the plot, a hardened al qaeda leader determined to strike beyond the borders of yemen to the american homeland. he was
whether the affordable care act is hurting our workforce. >>> al-jazeera america launching this week. we will talk with howard kurtz about the new cable player. too big. too small. too soft. too tasty. [ both laugh ] [ male announcer ] introducing progresso's new creamy alfredo soup. inspired by perfection. [ crashing ] [ male announcer ] when your favorite food starts a fight, fight back fast with tums. heartburn relief that neutralizes acid on contact and goes to work in seconds. ♪ tum, tum tum tum tums! heather: right now some international headlines that we're watching for you at this hour. two deadly explosions in northern lebanon. it may have been a coordinated attack at two mosques packed with people on a day of prayer. the health minister saying that more than two dozen are dead and more than 300 have been injured. the bombings come as tensions rise over the civil war in neighboring syria. >>> and another attack in lebanon, this one coming from the south. israeli warplanes striking suspected terror target out of bay right. after al qaeda inspired militants fired 4:00 rockets fr
says america isn't free and runs off to china and russia detail about us is not my idea of a great american patriot. but i think the issue is worth looking at. but i do put a lot of trust in people that defended the united states of america for their entire careers, 30 and 40 years, with distinction and with honor and with valor, put their lives on the line for the country. when they walk in and tell me, this is what it is and we're not doing this and we're not doing that, we're not doing this, and asking me questions, then i've got to know more than that before cure the rot. fortunately congress will keep looking at this and that's the one good thing that's come out of it. it will continue to be in the press and in the scrutiny. you know, like you, always worry about concentrations of power and individual liberty. i think that's what keeps america free. is that individual citizens are passionate about that and their series about that. at the same time you've got to see the abuses, you've got to know where they are. and i don't think that communism we lost our freedom. if we had we
, to restore that shining city on a hill that is the united states of america. thank you and god bless you. [applause] >> thank you so much. first of all, i want to say i learned something new tonight. here in new hampshire, we say thank you all. in texas, they think all you all. is that more thank you or more people? >> technically speaking, all y'a ll is the plural of y'all. that was ronald reagan reminded us that freedom is only one generation away from extension. if we do not engage now in the freedom, we will want -- we will one day be telling our children what it is like to be free. i need to repair and oversight. we have another candidate. i know there is nobody here who wants to see custer win another term in the united states house. we know we have a potential candidate and former senator gary lambert. he is with us tonight. i hope you get a chance to say hello to him as well. now, our host, i do so much. >> hey, did we have a speaker tonight. joseph and i -- you turn down the heat to much. we would like to ask -- invite you all to have some coffee in the back. there is wonderful
went around america. it could put up maybe 2 million jobs. compromise with the tea party and the regular republicans? they are a bunch of zeroes. they do not want to work with this president. look at medicare and social security. how they want to break that down -- but the american people work for at all their life. they want to break that down to nothing. they do not care about america. they do not care about this president. host: stephen is from richmond virginia. a few tweets -- our last caller brought up the idea of the health-care law and how it is playing into this debate. here's a story from today's "new york times" on that subject -- -- also known as obamacare. we are taking your thoughts on these budgetary issues that are facing congress and the country. ron is up next from tampa, florida on our republican line. what do you think about that proposal to hold off federal federal funding measure includes financing for the affordable care act? forward. would be all i just think compromises a big joke. the democratsthat have their way. a city in california went bankru
new plans to overhaul america's mortgage system today. he's going to propose shutting down government-backed lenders fannie mae and freddie mac, plus, he wants to boost the number of 30-year mortgages in this market hoping it will make loans more accessible to more people so they can fulfill the american dream. carl cameron has more from washington. so a lot of proposals, carl. we're not sure exactly what will become of them, but what is the president proposing today in. >> reporter: well, he wants to strengthen the housing market by making 30-year mortgages more available, and one of the ways would be to do away with fannie mae and freddie mac and institute more capital into mortgage lending. shaun donovan is the president's hud secretary, the secretary of housing and urban development. he's how he put it this morning. >> we also have to make sure we never go back to a system that takes trillions of dollars in housing wealth away from families that can crash the spire world economy. so -- the entire world economy. so a big focus is how do we build a safe, stable housing finance syste
of them. there you have it, america. >> i did a morning show before this one, local new york station, 12 years. one time i missed the show. didn't set the alarm. alarm doesn't ring if you don't set it. >> won't wake you up. >> i woke up so late. there was no chance of salvaging my time. one in 12 years. >> one in 39. that's all right. >> quite a record. >> beyonce is so cool. she has a concert at barclay center. in brooklyn. she bikes. bikes over the brooklyn bridge. incognito. what she was wearing. she instagrammed to prove it. blue t-shirt covered in white stars, cut off shorts. and some shades. there it is. all right. she biked all the way to her show. right across the bridge. and jay-z, her husband, unannounced cameo at the show. so, pretty cool. >> bike on the way to your superstar show. >> giving love to disney the parent company of abc news. released the trailer of "muppets most wanted" a sequel to the hit that rejuvenated the franchise. in 2011. anyway, here's your trailer. it is so cute. ♪ >> i'll show you all the moves. like jagger i've got the moves like jagger ♪ >> the mu
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america. texas. that truck now a burned out shell, the driver dead, investigators saying he was heading west in grand prairie, a dallas suburb, when his big rig slammed through a guardrail, landed on the turnpike below, the crash shutting the highway for hours both directions. no one else was hurt. >>> pennsylvania. two boys in danville credited with saving their dad's life. he had a seizure and collapsed on the family vacation. six-year-old marky called for help. >> i told mommy, daddy isn't normal. >> the three-year-old sprung into action. help arrived to take dad to the hospital who has several broken bones. no word what caused his seizure, he is awaiting test results. meantime, he is just proud of his kids. >> very nice. >>> wisconsin, happy national mustard day. people heading to national mustard museum in middleton to celebrate the taste of the yellow topping. >> so many varieties, flavors, textures. >> 4,000 hot dogs served with mustard from all over the world. more than 450 different kinds showcased. >> goes back a long way, unlike ketchup, mustard has character, class, flavor a
or keep fighting. >>> and america goes on high alert. the latest on how real the threat may be. >>> a chilling look through the eyes of an assassin. lost track of how many he's murders. an american teen takes us inside the ruthless drug cartel he killed for starting at just 15 years old. >>> we begin with the biggest forced doping story since lance armstrong. alex rodriguez, the highest paid number 5 on the all-time home run list signing autographs today. once denied using steroids then denied using them after 2003 now suspended for using them since then, accused of doping and having ties to a south florida anti-aging clinic biogenesis. a-rod drew a 211 game suspension without pay and today spoke to reporters. >> i'm fighting for my life. i have to defend myself. if i don't defend myself no one else will. >> the suspension takes affect thursday. he can play during his appeal. he's playing tonight in chicago. joining us in a bristol, connecticut, and the lead reporter on the story since its developed over the past few weeks. jason, a rough day for alex rodriguez and major league
in the united states. good evening and welcome to c-span's continuing series on america's first ladies. tonight, you will learn about lucy webb hayes. the wife of rutherford the hayes. here to start us off is a first ladies historian and author of a collection of biographies. welcome. in 1876, the country is joyously celebrating the 100th centennial of the declaration of independence and it is an election year. the election is greatly contested with no clear victor. tell us about the atmosphere with which it was at the white house. what was it like? >> susan, it is pretty schizophrenic, to tell you the truth. we had just come out of the centennial celebration. they were coming to the white house, but they do not know if they will move into the white house. the election is not yet decided. what happened is samuel and rutherford b. hayes were in one of the closest elections in the united states at that point. and tilden wins the popular vote. there are three states that are so tight, the parties are tackling each other. the republicans said, we won. the democrats said, no, we won. hayes goes to b
and concerned about things. >> that is on my business card. >> we replicate the procedures that america follows of authorizing stuff by legislation , setting decisions by court, supervising it by inspector general's. done in a to be secret way in order that enemies do not find out about it and could therefore it made it. that is the way it goes. >> and do not exclude the possibility of new legislation. if congress wants to fix it, they have oversight abilities to hear all this material in classified form and decide whether they want to tweak the law. >> you would prefer to see, i suspect, open debate before the supreme court, but you could go the congressional route to address the concerns you have raised. >> i guess they each have their own functions. one determines what the legislation should be. one determines what is constitutional. my preference would be that both get their shot at it. but that is just me. more,oing to ask only one because i am told there are 20 minutes remaining, and i want to give you time on the floor. briefly, would each of you give your observations on civil , a board
task force at the new america foundation and former senior policy adviser commissioner of the palestinian refugee agency, jeremy, president and founder of political home for pro israel pro peace americans. an msnbc contributor and foreign policy analyst for newsweek and managing director of the washington institute and former senior director for middle east affairs at the national security council. thank you all for joining me. i want to start with you. how important is it this happens now under this secretary of state and this president? >> the urgency is real. if they don't achieve peace now, the spiraling is real. palestinian authority likely could collapse. israelis would have to go back in and assume full civil and military control of the west bank, violence would erupt. in the context of the region you described, violence there sets off sparks around the whole region, so this an incredibly important moment and incredibly high stakes decision by the administration to go for it at this moment. >> it's not entirely unheard of for a second term american president to p
or anyone that he has followed strike any fear on our beloved citizens of the united states of america. >> cnn's ed lavendere is covering this from fort hood. ed, back to hasan and back to this less than two minutes statement, what did he say in that little time? what was your reaction to it in the courtroom? >> reporter: well, it was fascinating because the prosecutors had just spent the previous hour meticulously detailing how he carried out the massacre not too far away from where this trial is going on and how the 13 people were killed and more than 30 others were wound wounded. it was pretty painful to hear. prosecutors were talking about one pregnant woman who was pleading for the life of her child. she was pleading my baby, my baby, and you heard a shot and she was silent. hasan stood up and in a matter of moments took away all of that attention and said he claimed to be the shooter just right out of the gate. took away any pretense about whether or not this trial would be about his guilt or innocence. hasan basically declaring he is the shooter. he went on to say that the evide
. unconstitutional. it goes against what america's founding fathers have said. >> that is a great question. prism program is largely classified. there has been some talk about it. i have to be careful with what i say. the bottom line is, there are too many people in congress right now who are forgetting that there is a constitution that restricts what they do. the point of the constitution is to restrict what the federal government does. in the name of security, they are forgetting that their first right or the is to protect liberties. that is why we have a government to ensure that we have liberty as a people. that is what they are forgetting. they are focused solely on the security aspect. ory think as long as the nsa some other agency is stopping bad guys, they can go after collecting information on all sorts of people and have no consequences. of course, there is a huge threat to that. we do not want the government to have this kind of data to use against americans in the future. >> yeah. about,'m also worried like, all the gay rights stuff. i'm thinking, like, this could be like the racism t
. >> he's got that little one looking at him. >>> could america be getting some of that power? yeah. variety is reporting will i. am is in talks to join the judging table for "american idol" after reports jennifer lopez may also return to the show. that means keith urban, jennifer lopez, will i. am. >> talk about a range. >> i know, i like. >>> the race is on to cast batman in the sequel to "man of steel," so ryan gosling. >> yes, please. >> joe, richard, all rumored to be in the running, but the front-runner, 46-year-old josh brolin. what do you think about that? >> i think it fits. >> wolf man from "true blood." >> i remember him from "magic mike." all i remember is "magic mike." >> mrs. cuomo threw me into a bowl of potato salad when we met him at a party. made me go up and introduce her. >> excuse me, hi! >> oh, my. >> we'll also throw chris into potato salad. >> i like potato salad. >> all right, guys. >> i love it, ryan gosling, thank you. >>> coming up next on "new day," also someone we love, matt damon gets a new look for his new movie. he's buff, he's tough, and he's sittin
the blogs, social media -- >> it's the middle america that doesn't care. if you don't have the swing voter that cares -- >> the swing voter's not the most vocal person out there the. >> they need to show up. >> when they hear from the constituency -- >> they're only hearing from the base, right, the middle, the sort of rational middle, the angry middle, they're not going to town hall meetings. >> look, gerrymandering, think about it, right, we go back to it every time we talk about it. there's no incentive for house republicans and democrats to compromise. >> but you're talking about the vise that boehner's in. look at mcconnell. he's taking the opinion, it seems, he used to rule with an iron fist. he basically is going it's every man for himself. i feel like he's basically saying, i got to deal with my problems and i know it makes me probably a less affective leader so he's backing off. he's letting -- what's interesting to in, he's letting some republicans -- yeah, you want that, go for it. >> mitch mcconnell, he's going to that fair this weekend, and he has a millionaire right winger go
to say what is happening in rural america in general. what we have found is, particularly in the south and southwest, rural school districts have been consolidated almost to the hills. very large districts in their role self. we think, to a large extent, we have reached the economies of scale in these communities. that makes sense for those communities. but what happens, for the most part, you do not achieve cost savings and the quality that most proponents of consolidation assume that you will achieve by consolidation. particularly in the rural sites, you see it increased costs around transportation, lots more travel time for kids on buses, a much longer day. we have kids getting on the bus before daylight and they are getting off after sunset. when you factor those things into the formula of what is working, what should be the response to the small school problem -- and i do not like to think of it as a small school or small district problem -- it is a situation that exists that does not have to be problematic. when we look at it in terms of dollars saved by increasing numbers and re
for you. >> it was great to have you here, kelly. >> great to be here. >> america live starts right now. >> we start this hour with a fox news alert. less than two hours away from president obama's first formal solo news conference since april, a look for you in the white house. reporters expected to pepper him with questions about his decision not to meet with russian president vladimar putin and the administration's continued use of the controversial talking point. i am jamie colby. >> and i am greg
, the central social problem in america. >> host: next call for mr. elder, we have about seven minutes left in our program. dennis in sharon, massachusetts. hi, dennis. dennis? >> caller: yes. can you hear me? yes -- >> host: please go ahead. >> caller: okay, great. i'm a great fan of c-span. i watch booktv every weekend. my father was born in 1892, i was his first son. when i was born, he was in 60 years old. he left macon, georgia, as he told we because he saw a black man being burned in the fountain of downtown macon, georgia. the point i would like to make is that i really believe it's, obviously, the father being in the household is a tremendous service to the children, without a doubt. but most importantly i really believe this thing about mind power. having the focus in order to be able to have a discipline to achieve what your goals are in life. the other thing i want to say is that there's a psychological underpinning that i believe hardly anybody talks about in which people aspire to be the anti-antihero. so a lot of this outburst that we see is really someone who really believes
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